andrewdxtmer:

dane dehaan logic: “if i dress in nice enough clothes people will think the reason i haven’t combed my hair in 6 months is fashion and not laziness”

(via makenzie-rush)



northernlotus:

buckybatch:

imagine the avengers playing hide and seek and bucky is always a master at hiding so steve uses a metal detector to find him

"Bucky you’re in the couch."

Muffled swearing

(via makenzie-rush)


doctaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa:

TALK SHIT GET HIT 

(via makenzie-rush)


tappedout:

sizvideos:

Video

I am fucking awesome, thank you

(via makenzie-rush)


tiger-in-the-flightdeck:

He wouldn’t have been pecked to death! Oh my god, this man was risking getting his arms, legs, ribs and possibly his skull broken!

(via makenzie-rush)


a-storm-for-every-spring:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Dogs and Tumblr

One of these things is not like the others

(via chackennugger)


Some things never change.

(via rapunzelsexual)


marbleousmego:

igohardinovertime:

blacktionbronson:

mrkittykatface:

luduslad:

wishingonalightningbolt:

Same reason professional football players are paid more than scientists or professors. Same reason a tenured professor at a university is paid less than that university’s football coach.
Because the US values athleticism over academia. And it sucks.

Nope, it’s called being paid for the monetary value you bring. If you make 1 million dollars but help bring in 10 million you are a great value.

But honestly what are they bringing to society? Nothing. Just because you make the money doesn’t mean you’re an asset.

Have you ever been to america?

that tweet is so stupid 

Actually, it’s a legit problem that these kids are being admitted into college. Sure they bring money, but they are not equipped to handle college. And look, I was an NCAA D1 athlete. I’m a huge football fan. I see the cash these kids bring into the school. But it’s a huge issue.
Look at this CNN article from earlier this year.
Some highlights:

A CNN investigation found public universities across the country where many students in the basketball and football programs could read only up to an eighth-grade level….
As a graduate student at UNC-Greensboro, Willingham researched the reading levels of 183 UNC-Chapel Hill athletes who played football or basketball from 2004 to 2012. She found that 60% read between fourth- and eighth-grade levels. Between 8% and 10% read below a third-grade level….
The issue was highlighted at UNC two years ago with the exposure of a scandal where students, many of them athletes, were given grades for classes they didn’t attend, and where they did nothing more than turn in a single paper….
According to those academic experts, the threshold for being college-literate is a score of 400 on the SAT critical reading or writing test. On the ACT, that threshold is 16. Many student-athletes scored in the 200s and 300s on the SAT critical reading test — a threshold that experts told us was an elementary reading level and too low for college classes. The lowest score possible on that part of the SAT is 200, and the national average is 500….

I recommend you read the entire article. But it IS a problem. You can look at it from a money making perspective, sure. But don’t ignore the fact that a lot of these student-athletes are not even close to being prepared for college. They have the athlete part down, but not the student. While I was being recruited and watched peers be recruited, coaches often would sign just enough kids with high scores to average out the very talented, but lower-score athletes. Recruits in the middle— those who didn’t have superior grades or skill— were often overlooked or told to come back when their grades were better.
Sports fans, I’m sorry, I’m with you. But this is a big issue when illiterate students are taking the spot of well-educated students simply because they can make money for the university. And don’t get me started on how dangerous football is, and how most of the athletes won’t have more than used-up scholarship money to help with their medical expenses down the line.

marbleousmego:

igohardinovertime:

blacktionbronson:

mrkittykatface:

luduslad:

wishingonalightningbolt:

Same reason professional football players are paid more than scientists or professors. Same reason a tenured professor at a university is paid less than that university’s football coach.

Because the US values athleticism over academia. And it sucks.

Nope, it’s called being paid for the monetary value you bring. If you make 1 million dollars but help bring in 10 million you are a great value.

But honestly what are they bringing to society? Nothing. Just because you make the money doesn’t mean you’re an asset.

Have you ever been to america?

that tweet is so stupid 

Actually, it’s a legit problem that these kids are being admitted into college. Sure they bring money, but they are not equipped to handle college. And look, I was an NCAA D1 athlete. I’m a huge football fan. I see the cash these kids bring into the school. But it’s a huge issue.

Look at this CNN article from earlier this year.

Some highlights:

A CNN investigation found public universities across the country where many students in the basketball and football programs could read only up to an eighth-grade level….

As a graduate student at UNC-Greensboro, Willingham researched the reading levels of 183 UNC-Chapel Hill athletes who played football or basketball from 2004 to 2012. She found that 60% read between fourth- and eighth-grade levels. Between 8% and 10% read below a third-grade level….

The issue was highlighted at UNC two years ago with the exposure of a scandal where students, many of them athletes, were given grades for classes they didn’t attend, and where they did nothing more than turn in a single paper….

According to those academic experts, the threshold for being college-literate is a score of 400 on the SAT critical reading or writing test. On the ACT, that threshold is 16. Many student-athletes scored in the 200s and 300s on the SAT critical reading test — a threshold that experts told us was an elementary reading level and too low for college classes. The lowest score possible on that part of the SAT is 200, and the national average is 500….

I recommend you read the entire article. But it IS a problem. You can look at it from a money making perspective, sure. But don’t ignore the fact that a lot of these student-athletes are not even close to being prepared for college. They have the athlete part down, but not the student. While I was being recruited and watched peers be recruited, coaches often would sign just enough kids with high scores to average out the very talented, but lower-score athletes. Recruits in the middle— those who didn’t have superior grades or skill— were often overlooked or told to come back when their grades were better.

Sports fans, I’m sorry, I’m with you. But this is a big issue when illiterate students are taking the spot of well-educated students simply because they can make money for the university. And don’t get me started on how dangerous football is, and how most of the athletes won’t have more than used-up scholarship money to help with their medical expenses down the line.

(via chackennugger)


surprisebitch:

OH MY GOD

(via chackennugger)